Keith's Ramblings…

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PostgreSQL Extension Code Organization

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I was going to title this “Why is my extension failing to install in 9.3?”, but I figured a more general post about how I’ve been organizing my extension code would be more helpful. But I will also be answering that question along the way since my organization method provided a solution for me.

For extension installation, the code that installs objects within the database must be in a file in the format extension–version.sql. If your extension is primarily C code with just a few functions to provide calling methods, the SQL is usually pretty easy to maintain in a single file. You can organize the pre-compiled source code as needed and the Makefile can then designate the files that get compiled and installed during installation. But if your entire extension is PL/pgSQL (or any of the other scripting languages), it can really start to get hard to manage all that code in a single file, which is what I see most people doing.

Extensions were my first venture into even looking at the contents of a Makefile. I used the template from David Wheeler’s PGXN HowTo to get started. Learning what the bit of code below does gave me a clue to a way to manage things a little easier.

Essentially that tells make to copy the contents of whatever is after the colon into the filename given before the colon.  So my solution was to split all my functions, tables, types, etc out into their own files organized into folders and then have make pull it all together into a single file.

The order of the files listed after the colon is important since make pulls things together in the order given. In the single sql file for my pg_partman extension, types must be created before tables and tables must be created before functions. Your extension may need things done in a different order, so the important thing is to just organize your files in a manner that you can give make a specific order to merge things.

The main extension file (extension–version.sql) doesn’t necessarily have to contain all the installation code for the extension. You can include commands to read in your code stored in other files instead of having make merge it all together. But then whenever you have a new file, you have to remember to include it in the master file and possibly add it to the Makefile as well to ensure it gets copied over. This also puts more files in the PGSHARED folder. More of a pet peeve, but I like keeping that folder less cluttered.

The other thing I do to organize my extension code is to put the updates into a separate folder. For a while, I hadn’t realized that the following line in the PGXN Makefile was for copying all update files (filename format extension–oldversion–newversion.sql) along with the core extension file to the PGSHARED folder

So my extensions had just included instructions to manually copy updates to PGSHARED. But, when the 9.3 beta came out and I started testing things, I (along with many other extension developers) started getting this error during make install

This pgsql-hackers mailing list thread contains a discussion of what is causing this error & possible patches for PGXS to fix it back to the way it used to be. From what I’m understanding, it’s because the wildcard in the DATA value ($(wildcard sql/*–*.sql)) matches the second file’s naming pattern (sql/$(EXTENSION)–$(EXTVERSION).sql) and it’s trying to copy the same file over. A change in 9.3 PGXS is now causing an error to be thrown instead of either just ignoring it or copying it anyway (not sure what it originally did before 9.3).

Because I have my updates in a separate folder than where the core extension file is created, I can have a different DATA value and avoid this problem all together

Unfortunately since many people used the PGXN Makefile template, a lot of third-party extensions are running into this error after they upgrade to 9.3. Hopefully clarifying what is causing the error can help you fix your Makefile so your extensions can be installed on 9.3 without any problems.

Some of my extensions also contain scripts or alternate versions of functions for different purposes. For those I just make an “extras” folder and keep them there. And then for the scripts, I’ve added something like the following line to the Makefile to have them installed along with the extension code.

For more Makefile options see the PostgreSQL documentation on the Extension Building Infrastructure.

I’m not sure this code organization method for my extensions is the best way to do things. But the extension system is still fairly new, so the standard methods for doing things are still in flux. The only real issue I run into now is having to make sure the code in the update files matches the code in the individual object files. I use Meld to compare my update file to the object files to make sure things match up. Not the most elegant way, but it’s worked for quite a few updates of my extensions over the last year or so.

If anyone has any suggestions or sees any issues with this organization method, I’d appreciate feedback.

 

Written by Keith

October 25th, 2013 at 10:43 am

Posted in PostgreSQL

Tagged with , ,